Case #1 What price for the top grades???

Jill has always had trouble focusing. In middle school and high school, she has struggled to maintain her attention on class, homework, and other academic responsibilities. If not for her own determination and the encouragement of her parents, she probably would have never gone to college as she does now.

However, with midterms just around the corner, her inattentive tendencies are flaring worse than ever. And with poor grades after her first semester, she needs to do well on these tests to keep her GPA above her scholarship’s cutoff. Fortunately, a friend of hers, one familiar with Jill’s problems, has a prescription for Adderall and offers some to Jill so she can concentrate better during finals.

Jill only plans to take the pills this one time considering summer is so near. She doesn’t think she’s getting an advantage because her peers can already focus better than she can. She really needs higher grades this semester to keep her scholarship.

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Is it all right if she takes some Adderall?

Which ethical theory(s) are relevant to the article?

Whose perspective seems most relevant? Why?
















Case #2 Scholarship or sponsorship……

Jordan’s family never expected to be able to pay for their son to go to college, but because Jordan received a full ride scholarship to play football at a big university, he has now been given an opportunity his family never hoped for.

However, because his scholarship only covers tuition—and Jordan doesn’t have the time between classes and practices to get a job—he often isn’t able to afford social outings with friends like tickets to the movies or dinner in the city. In fact, he can rarely afford flights home to see his family, too. Still, he enjoys his sociology major and is looking forward to a career as a teacher after college.

Meanwhile, the university itself is making millions of dollars off of the ticket sales, concessions, and memorabilia that Jordan’s athletic talents have helped stimulate. In fact, the value of Jordan’s scholarship is probably just a tiny fraction of the value that he, as a star running back, generates among the university’s rabid fan base.

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Thus, is it really fair that he doesn’t receive some form of monetary compensation in addition to his scholarship?

Which ethical theory(s) are relevant to the article?

Whose perspective seems most relevant? Why?

 

 

 

 

 

Case #3 Escaping poverty……..

Wu, an illegal immigrant from China, thought he was lucky to escape from the Pei Sheng freighter minutes after it docked near the Lions Gate Bridge in May. He had expected a glorious new life after the harsh 6000-mile voyage from south China to Vancouver. Instead the 31-year-old Chinese tailor has made his way to Grande Prairie, where he’s heard there are jobs for those willing to work hard. However, being illegal in Canada he’s fearful he will be found either by the ruthless men who smuggled him here…. or by immigration officials sworn to track him down. Living as a fugitive, worried about his family and his own safety, Wu describes his predicament as one of intense pressure and cruel isolation. "I am not free in this country now," Wu says. He fears the "snakeheads" --the Chinese term for smugglers. He paid them an initial $3000 but still owes them $25,000 for his passage. They are hunting for him now. He knows if they find him, they will force his family in China to pay the money immediately or they will beat him or one of his family members to death.

He is worried about his family in China. He left his wife, two young sons and a daughter in Changle County -- the name means "everlasting happiness" -- in Fujian Province. Wu was a tailor and was able to support his family on an annual income of roughly $1600, until he lost his job. He felt he had no future in China: he was now jobless, with only an elementary school education, the youngest son of a factory worker and a produce seller.

So, when the snakeheads came to his village praising life in Canada and urging young men to sign up for passage, Wu grabbed what he believed to be a golden opportunity. His whole family worked together to come up with the $3000 for his passage.

"We had no idea what it is really like here," Wu says. He knows he must stay away from Immigration Canada or he will be deported. This forces him to find part-time jobs that often pay far below what other legal workers make, involves unpaid overtime hours, and sometimes abusive employers who are willing to ignore his illegal status to save money on labour and safety standards.  Wu knows that his situation is desperate. However; under Canada's current immigration laws If Wu can earn enough money he can legally apply for temporary residency and then sponsor his family to come to Canada after which they can apply for legal jobs. A friend introduces you to Wu and asks you give him a temporary job in your family's oil field business to earn the money he needs

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Do you give Wu a job with your family's business?

Which ethical theory(s) are relevant to the article?

Whose perspective seems most relevant? Why?